Set Yourself Free: Forgive Yourself, Forgive Them.


I read a true story recently.

A middle-school boy is in a broken home, no father-figure, no one cares for him.  He joins a gang.  His initiation: kill someone.  The boy picks another boy he barely knows from school.

The next day, after school, the new gang-member walks up to the innocent boy and shoots and kills him.

The police catch the murderer.  The mother of the dead, innocent boy is outraged.

At the murderer’s trial, right after he is sentenced to spend a few years in juvenile prison, the mother stands up, points to the convicted murder and shouts “I will kill you!”

The mother, her heart filled with hatred and unanswered questions, occasionally visits the murderer in juvenile prison.

Years later, the murderer is freed.

The mother asks him “do you have food to eat?”


“Do you have a job?”


“Do you have a place to stay?”


The mother tells the boy: “I will cook for you, get a job for you, and I have a spare bedroom you can sleep in.”

The freed murderer accepts.

Years later, the mother sits in the living room and asks the boy to come in.

“Do you remember, at your trial, I told you ‘I will kill you’?”

“Yes ma’am, I’ve thought about it every single day.”

“Me too,” replies the mother, “and I have already killed you.  You are not the boy you once were.”

“I want to adopt you,” the mother says, “I want you to be my son.”

The boy accepts.

[The above story is from Jack Kornfield’s audiobook Awakening is Real.  Minor details may have been changed because I wrote this from memory] 

Gandhi Forgiveness

There are three kinds of forgiveness (all of which you can do):

1. Of yourself from others (your thoughts or feelings you have that you think caused or should cause others to hold on to bitterness/hatred against you)
2. Of yourself (your own bitterness/hatred against yourself)
3. Of others from yourself (your feelings or thoughts of bitterness/hatred against others)


How to Forgive

Try the following meditation from Jack Kornfield:

To practice forgiveness meditation, let yourself sit comfortably, allowing your eyes to close and your breath to be natural and easy. Let your body and mind relax. Breathing gently into the area of your heart, let yourself feel all the barriers you have erected and the emotions that you have carried because you have not forgiven – not forgiven yourself, not forgiven others. Let yourself feel the pain of keeping your heart closed. Then, breathing softly, begin asking and extending forgiveness, reciting the following words, letting the images and feelings that come up grow deeper as you repeat them.

FORGIVENESS OF OTHERS: There are many ways that I have hurt and harmed others, have betrayed or abandoned them, cause them suffering, knowingly or unknowingly, out of my pain, fear, anger and confusion. Let yourself remember and visualize the ways you have hurt others. See and feel the pain you have caused out of your own fear and confusion. Feel your own sorrow and regret. Sense that finally you can release this burden and ask for forgiveness. Picture each memory that still burdens your heart. And then to each person in your mind repeat: I ask for your forgiveness, I ask for your forgiveness.

FORGIVENESS FOR YOURSELF: There are many ways that I have hurt and harmed myself. I have betrayed or abandoned myself many times through thought, word, or deed, knowingly or unknowingly. Feel your own precious body and life. Let yourself see the ways you have hurt or harmed yourself. Picture them, remember them. Feel the sorrow you have carried from this and sense that you can release these burdens. Extend forgiveness for each of them, one by one. Repeat to yourself: For the ways I have hurt myself through action or inaction, out of fear, pain and confusion, I now extend a full and heartfelt forgiveness. I forgive myself, I forgive myself.

FORGIVENESS FOR THOSE WHO HAVE HURT OR HARMED YOU: There are many ways that I have been harmed by others, abused or abandoned, knowingly or unknowingly, in thought, word or deed. Let yourself picture and remember these many ways. Feel the sorrow you have carried from this past and sense that you can release this burden of pain by extending forgiveness when your heart is ready. Now say to yourself: I now remember the many ways others have hurt or harmed me, wounded me, out of fear, pain, confusion and anger. I have carried this pain in my heart too long. To the extent that I am ready, I offer them forgiveness. To those who have caused me harm, I offer my forgiveness, I forgive you.

Let yourself gently repeat these three directions for forgiveness until you feel a release in your heart. For some great pains you may not feel a release but only the burden and the anguish or anger you have held. Touch this softly. Be forgiving of yourself for not being ready to let go and move on. Forgiveness cannot be forced; it cannot be artificial. Simply continue the practice and let the words and images work gradually in their own way. In time you can make the forgiveness meditation a regular part of your life, letting go of the past and opening your heart to each new moment with a wise loving kindness.


Here’s a guided, audio version of the meditation.

And here’s another version.


You will discover that forgiveness is a choice that you make.

And it’s self-soothing.

No Longer Defined By The Pain But The Future PossibilitiesForgiveness is not condoning the past.  You don’t even have to make amends with the actual person (if it’s someone other than you).

Forgiveness starts with you, on the inside.

It’s freeing yourself from your own prison of bitterness, hatred, and other negative thoughts and emotions.

(since you built the prison and put yourself in a cell, you can walk out anytime you want — you’re the prisoner and the warden)


If you’re having a tough time forgiving or you want to learn more about the psychology of forgiveness, start with the REACH model for forgiving.

Forgiveness = Freedom.

Happy forgiving!  

Who Do You Think You Are? (the most important exercise)

The answer to this question is the answer to all of your problems

The answer to this question is the answer to all of your problems

When you say “I,” who are you referring to?

Are you your name?  Your body?  Your occupation?  Your life history?  Your religion?  Your beliefs?  Your thoughts?  Your emotions?

Who are you, really?

This is an immensely important question.

If you think you’re the brain or you’re running the show from the brain, let me tell you about the sea squirt.

At one stage in this tadpole-like sea creature’s life, it swims over and buries itself into a rock.  Can you guess what’s the first thing the sea squirt does inside the rock?  That’s right, it digests its own brain and nervous system!  Then it continues to live, motionless, inside the rock.

(the sea squirt is also an excellent example of what happens when you continue doing the same thing every day or you never challenge yourself)

So maybe your true Self isn’t the brain or tucked away inside the brain.

If You are not hiding inside the head, then who are you?

If You are not hiding inside the head, then Who Are You?

Who are you, then?

Let’s try a liberating exercise.

Take out five pieces of paper (you can break up one sheet into five pieces) and write down five separate answers to the question “Who Am I?”

(you can write anything you want; “law student,” “Christian,” “Mike Jones,” “Joe and Jill’s daughter,” “a human being,” etc.)

Then order your five pieces of paper with #1 being the furthest from the “core” of who you think you are and #5 being the closest to the core of who you think you are.

Place the stack on your desk.  Pick up #1.  Look at what you wrote down.  Read it to yourself.  Feel it.  Say “this is who I am.”

Then prepare to say good-bye to your first illusion.

Crumple up the piece of paper (literally).

Place the crumpled up piece of paper in front of you.

Pick up #2.  Look at what you wrote down.  Read it.  Feel it.  Say “this is who I am.”

Then say good-bye to your second illusion.

Crumple it up.

Crumpled Up Balls

Continue this process until you get to the last piece of paper.

You might feel anxious, uncertain, or scared as you read and feel your most central idea of who you are.

But it too must be crumpled and tossed.

Now you have five balled-up pieces of paper.

(if you don’t have at last five crumpled up pieces of paper in front of you, stop reading and start doing this important exercise).

What remains is who you truly are.

It may feel weird at first.  But it’s actually the most wonderful realization you can possibly have.

No Self, No Problems.  


Illusions of Self are the root of all of your problems.  Throw them away.

Repeat this exercise as many times with as many illusions as you want.  If your ego is especially stubborn, do it every single morning.  Even if you realize who you truly are, you may want to continue this process to let it truly sink in.

Keep tossing away illusions

Keep tossing away illusions!

Your true Self, you will discover, is beyond labels, words, ideas, thoughts, emotions.

Once you crumple up and throw away all of the illusions, You will be free.

Man standing with hand out, looking up, paper balls in mid-air around him

Goodbye, Illusions.

The world needs You, not the illusion of you.

(food for thought: why do many people who commit suicide fire the bullet into their head?) 

Rumi Ocean

This exercise may seem weird.  You may resist doing it.  You may resist continuing with it until the realization really sinks in.

Resistance is a sign that you must do it; it’s vitally important.

So if you haven’t actually taken out the pieces of paper and done the exercise, do it.

And if you’ve only done this exercise once or twice and there’s no change, then keep doing it.  No excuses.

The person is a concept Only Being is Real

Interesting Fact: the word “person” actually comes from the Latin word “persona,” meaning mask or facade presented to satisfy the demands of the situation or environment and not representing the inner personality of the individual; an assumed identity or character (like in a play).

When you realize who you really are, you will be ready to become who you were meant to be.

You will be ready to give this world the gift that has been inside of you all along.

You will be able to treat everyone and everything compassionately.  You will be able to overcome every single one of your petty problems.

You will be free from unhealthy obsessions that plague society — like greed, consumerism, selfishness.


I read a book on happiness recently.  It said the #1 most important exercise to becoming happy is to Stop Feeling Sorry For Yourself.

That’s a great practice.  It’s highly recommended.

Eckhart Tolle

But the practice we’re doing right now is even better.

(instead of “Stop Feeling Sorry For Yourself,” it’s “Stop Yourself”…or… “Stop Feeling Illusions Of Yourself”).

You will feel unimaginable levels of the most profound bliss when you reach this state.

Happiness will now be a purely internal state, unaffected by anything external.

No Other Greater Ecstacy

You will be free from basing your happiness on the weather or anything or anyone else.


(a pretend disease that pretend people pretend to have)

Happiness will no longer be a Pursuit.  Or a goal.  Or something that hopefully will happen sometime in the future.

Happiness will not be circumstantial.

And depression won’t exist.

Who will be there to be depressed?

Anger won’t exist.

Who is angry?

Hatred won’t exist.

Fear won’t exist.

All bad things, bad feelings, bad thoughts require a subject.

What happens when there is no subject?

(the feelings and emotions may still pop up, but they will float away like a balloon — no one is there to hold onto these negative states and negative beliefs)

“We do not ‘come into’ this world; we come out of it, as leaves from a tree.  As the ocean ‘waves,’ the universe ‘peoples.’  Every individual is an expression of the whole realm of nature, a unique action of the total universe.  This fact is rarely, if ever, experienced by most individuals.  Even those who know it to be true in theory do not sense or feel it, but continue to be aware of themselves as isolated ‘egos’ inside bags of skin…The most strongly enforced of all known taboos is the taboo against knowing who or what you really are behind the mask of your apparently separate, independent, and isolated ego.'” – Alan Watts

Surrender to your true Self.

There is a voice that doesn't use words.  Listen.

Toss away all Illusions.


 And do not be afraid when you realize who you really are.


Do not let the ego know the truth.

Simply become the truth.

God Rumi

It’s Your Fault (and Stop Complaining)

It's Your Fault

“If you could kick the person in the pants responsible for most of your trouble, you wouldn’t sit for a month.” – Theodore Roosevelt

Most of us are really good at playing


Right now, jump out of your chair and shout “GAME OVER!”

It’s time to stop pointing the finger at anyone or anything other than yourself.  It’s time to develop a ritual of taking too much responsibility.

(how about getting a Complaint Free Bracelet and challenging yourself to go 21 days without complaining?)

“The power behind taking responsibility for your actions lies in putting an end to negative thought patterns. You no longer dwell on what went wrong or focus on whom you are going to blame. You don’t waste time building roadblocks to your success. Instead, you are set free and can now focus on succeeding.” – Lorii Myers

I promise, taking responsibility for anything you have control over will bring you tranquility, self-esteem, self-empowerment, and a winning attitude.

(it takes a lot of energy, focus, and stress to decide who or what to blame)

Just try it out: 21 days without blaming anyone or anything else.

“Liberty means responsibility.  That is why most men dread it.” – George Bernard Shaw

Will you join me in the journey toward self-responsibility and becoming complaint free?

complaint free world photo




Grades Don’t Matter. Just Do Your Best


“Just do your best.” – Buddha’s last lesson 

Grades don’t matter.

“Get A’s” should never be your goal.

Instead, your goal should be: “do my best.”

The 1L Curve is mean — only a handful of the hundreds of bright, talented students in your section will get an A in any given class.  Past your 1L year, many professors are stingy with handing out A’s (this isn’t high school).

The Stoics (such as Marcus Aurelius) advised to set internal rather than external goals.

Thus, your goal in law school should not be to be #1 in the class or get a 4.0 (something external, over which you only have partial control).

Instead, your goal should be to study and perform to the best of your ability in every class (something internal, over which you have complete control).


By choosing the internal goal you will spare yourself the frustration or disappointment should you not achieve your external goal: Since it’s not your goal to be the best, you will not suffer the emotional turmoil as long as you do your best.

If you put in 50% effort and get an A-, you should feel ashamed.

If you put in 100% effort and get a C, you should feel proud.


Note: doing your best and being the best are actually causally connected; you’ll probably get higher grades if you’re only competing with yourself.

The wise Stoics realized that our internal goals affect our external performance, but they also realized that the goals we consciously set for ourselves can have a dramatic impact on our subsequent emotional state.

In particular, if we consciously set out to be #1 in the class as our goal, we arguably don’t increase our chances of being #1.  In fact, we might even hurt our chances: If it starts looking, early on, as though we are going to get lower grades than we hoped, we might become frustrated or burned out, and this might put us out of the race.

Further, by having our goal linked to an external event that may or may not happen (e.g. get all A’s!), we dramatically increase our chances of being upset on grade distribution day.

But if we set our goal as doing our best, we arguably don’t lessen our chances of getting excellent grades, but we do lessen our chances of being upset on grade distribution day.

Thus, internalizing our goal as doing our best has an upside — reduces emotional anguish in the future — with no downside.

You have complete control over the amount of effort you put into your studies, your essays, your finals.

You have little to no control over the grades you get.

(in fact, it’s well established that professors use the stair toss method to grade exams — luck might not be on your side that day).



  • Your Goal: Do My Best! (you’ll be happier and you’ll perform better)
  • Not Your Goal: Top 10%! (you’ll go crazy and you’ll open yourself up to burnout)

P.S. – Joe Biden, the guy with the most chill job in the world, graduated in the bottom 10% of his law school class.

Joe Biden Sleeping


You can always be VP.

Seven Ways to Cure Law Student Burnout


Burnout.  Loss of motivation.  For most law students, it’s a fact of life.  But it doesn’t have to be.

You can rise above burnout.

Here are seven antidotes:

1. Be Mindful

Law school and eating an elephant are both mastered in the same way: one bite at a time.


This is the only moment that’s real.


The past and the future are illusions; let any thoughts about such imaginary times just float right on by.

2. Be Optimistic

Optimism is a choice.  Be positive.


Think: how could I make this fun?  (how about making a music video out of legos?)

3. Reward Progress

If you read 10 pages then you get a cookie.


(in fact, your brain performs better when it has energy to convert into glucose — cookies do help you study by boosting up your willpower!).

4. Be Grateful

Wasn’t it your dream to go to law school?

Didn’t you get here with lots of loving support from others?

Didn’t you work hard to get here?

Your professors are helping transform you into a lawyer.  They don’t assign 100 pages of reading to be mean.  Everything they do is really to help mold you into an amazing, talented, thoughtful attorney.

Could you be grateful for this challenge?


Close your eyes for a few moments, take a few deep breaths, and imagine all of the people and the hard work that got you here.  Thank them.  Smile.  Get back to work.

5. Exercise

Create a ritual of exercising every day.


(even two minutes a day can work wonders)

(and you can listen to law lectures while exercising)

6. Set Clear Goals and Action Steps

Make sure you have definite, measurable, time-oriented goals.

smart goal setting concept

Then break your goals down into bite-sized action steps.


Then do it.

7. Adopt a New Metaphor for Life

What’s your metaphor for life?  (everyone has one).

If it’s pessimistic or unhelpful, change it.

If you can’t think of a new metaphor for life, try this one:


Moving means studying.  Persevering.  Not worrying about the final or all of the pages you have to read.

Moving is only now; this one word you are reading right now.

Keep moving.  Keep fighting.

Parts of your journey through law school may be painful.

But those are only growing pains.

You are undergoing an amazing transformation; coal becomes a diamond only under immense pressure and incredible heat.

Law school is not hard.

It’s just an elephant.

Eat it one bite at a time.


Life of Pi


Pi and Richard Parker stranded in the middle of nowhere.

If you haven’t already, go watch Life of Pi. It’s my favorite movie of all-time.  Beautiful.  Thought-provoking.  Inspirational.

Without spoiling the movie, I can tell you that it’s about developing a philosophy of life; it’s about deciding how you look at the world.

It’s loosely based on a true story: Regina v. Dudley and Stephens.  In the real story, four men are shipwrecked in the middle of the ocean.  No rescue in sight.  They’re dying.  Three weeks go by.  No food, no water.  Richard Parker, an inexperienced 16 year old seaman, falls into a coma.  Can they eat him?  Would you blame them?

Back to the movie: Pi tells two stories about what happened; two ways to look at the world.  You get to pick which one you want to believe.

(I believe in Pi’s first story).

Beyond Thinking Like a Lawyer

In law school, they try to teach you to “think like a lawyer.”  But that’s only a small piece of the puzzle of being a lawyer.

This blog is about the other pieces.  I will focus mainly on developing emotional intelligence, mindfulness, calmness, mental fortitude, time management, and other life skills.

Beyond Thinking Like a Lawyer

What am I grateful for?

Today’s skill: gratitude.   

Studies show that gratitude promotes happiness, health, sleep, calmness, longevity, and more.

Taking just a few moments to write down who or what you’re grateful for has immense rewards.

Call to action: write down five things you’re grateful for.

Anything counts.  Your parents, the Universe, memories, opportunities, life, wealth, health.

If you’re a real daredevil, you can try a gratitude visualization.

Goal: Make everyday Thanksgiving.